When is the best time of the year to celebrate your wedding day?

When is the best time of the year to celebrate your wedding day?

I was so excited to tell my friends about my wedding day! It took me a long time to decide a best day. Mainly wanted to pick a day that is comfortable for everybody body to attend my ceremony. I picked a day off! I called my best friend, who is going to be my maid of honor and surprisingly she told me not to choose that day! She said it is not my lucky day!

So I started to think more, went online and searched for my lucky day! And I was wishing to find an easy way to choose a best day. I said to myself, I can be the one who makes everybody’s life easier!

When is the best time of the year to celebrate your wedding day?

According to Taliscope lucky days are identified by pairs or triplets of identical numbers, arranged horizontally or vertically within the magic. While the horoscope confines itself to identify your destiny, good or bad, but without more, the Taliscope protects you against the evil spell, with the magic square-talisman.

The lucky days of January 2011 are the dates 1, 2, 5, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of February 2011 are the dates of 2, 5, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of March 2011 are the dates of 1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of April 2011 are the dates 1, 2, 4, 5, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of May 2011 are the dates of 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of June 2011 are the dates of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of July 2011 are the dates of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of August 2011 are the dates of 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of September 2011 are the dates of 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of October 2011 are the dates of 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of November 2011 are the dates of 5, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

The lucky days of December 2011 are the dates of 5, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 19 and 21.

According to chinese calendar in 2011 your lucky days will be

The lucky days of January 2011 are the dates 5, 6, 17, 20, 26, 30.
The lucky days of February 2011 are the dates of 1, 9, 17, 21, 23.
The lucky days of March 2011 are the dates of 1, 9, 17, 21.
The lucky days of April 2011 are the dates 14, 19, 24, 26, 27.
The lucky days of May 2011 are the dates of 7, 9, 18, 22, 31.
The lucky days of June 2011 are the dates of 6, 9, 28.
The lucky days of July 2011 are the dates of 7, 11, 19.
The lucky days of August 2011 are the dates of 1, 4, 10, 14, 16.
The lucky days of September 2011 are the dates of 7, 11, 13.
The lucky days of October 2011 are the dates of 5, 18, 27.
The lucky days of November 2011 are the dates of 9, 21.
The lucky days of December 2011 are the dates of 7, 19, 28.

In USA

According to Taliscope, 4th of July is a lucky day and this day is the independency day in USA. Monday 4 July 2011.

According to Taliscope, 5th of September is a lucky day and this day is the labor day in USA. Monday 5 September 2011.

According to Taliscope, 10th of October is a lucky day and this day is Columbus day in USA. Monday 10 October 2011.

According to Taliscope, 11th of November is a lucky day and this day is Veterans day in USA. Friday 11 November 2011.

In Singapore

According to Taliscope, 2nd of May is a lucky day and this day is Labour day in Singapore. Monday 2 May 2011.

According to Taliscope, 17th of May is a lucky day and this day is Vesak day in Singapore. Tuesday 17 May 2011.

According to Taliscope, 9th of August is a lucky day and this day is National day in Singapore. Tuesday 9 August 2011.

In Malaysia

According to Taliscope, 2nd of May is a lucky day and this day is Labour day in Malaysia. Monday 2 May 2011.

According to Taliscope, 17th of May is a lucky day and this day is Vesak day in Malaysia. Tuesday 17 May 2011.

In Indonesia

According to Taliscope, 17th of May is a lucky day and this day is Vesak day in Indonesia. Tuesday 17 May 2011.

In China

According to Taliscope, 2nd of May is a lucky day and this day is Labour day in China. Monday 2 May 2011.

According to Taliscope, 6th of Jun is a lucky day and this day is Tuen Ng Festival in China . Monday 6 Jun 2011.

According to Chinese Calendar, 13th of September is a lucky day and this day is Mid Autumn Festival in China. Tuesday 13 September 2011.

I found a super lucky one, according to Chinese Calendar and Taliscope 5th of October is a lucky day and this day is Chung Yeung Festival in China. Wednesday 5 October 2011.

In UK

29th of April is the Royal Wedding day, this day could be a good memorable day for you and your guests to celebrate your wedding day.

According to Taliscope, 2nd of May is a lucky day and this day is early May Bank Holiday in UK. Monday 2 May 2011.

According to Taliscope, 5th of November is a lucky day and this day is Guy Fawkes day in UK, This night known as bonfire night as well. Many people set up bonfires and fireworks. What is better than having a city fireworks for your wedding day! Saturday 5 November 2011.

Wedding and Travel wish you a happy life

Returning Love

Souvenir

A souvenir in return for their love is a thoughtful gesture that will leave indelible imprints on your girlfriends’ and bridesmaids’ memory of your wedding celebrations. And it doesn’t have to cost you anything more than you’re ready to spend. These Do-It-Yourself gifts are not only pretty, they can be functional as well. Of course, it would be even sweeter if you attempt to create these yourself. It could even be a little project for you and your new spouse to work on together as you prepare for the big day.

Paper Art

These paper balls are easy to create, a lot of fun to work with and inviting to look at. Dolly paper can be scrunched up for a softer effect. Or you can choose your favourite printed designs from a heavier cardboard paper. You can go with your friends’ favourite colours or their favourite motifs. Draw some inspiration from origami books as well. You can display your finished paper art in little jars or bottles (affordable and easily available from places like Daiso). Consider putting them with pot-purri for a soft scented impact. You might wish to dab perfume on your paper art but that runs a risk of damaging the paper. Why not add a short “Thank You” on your finished work, a lovely expression of your thanks on your work of art.

Gift Tags & Pouches

They resemble little tote bags – both functional and rather cute to look at. Sizes can be customised to your preference. Again, designs are plentiful. Surely your friends would all love to have something that meets their favourite colours and taste? A simple cut-out piece of cloth tied with a ribbon can act as a gift tag or a means for you to pen your thanks. You could present it to them with the tag hanging on a flower, for instance. Alternatively, if you prefer to sew a little pouch, that could also hold a note of thanks or some well-wishes for all they have helped you with.

Jewellery/Hair Clips

Your friends would be delighted to don these pretty accessories designed and handmade by you. You could try to get some inspiration from books or jewellery catalogues. Special keychains could be made for those friends who are not particularly into jewellery. The completed adornments could be kept in little boxes or tied around cardboard squares for a more finished look. A plain hair clip could also be the canvas for you to work with, adding little rose buds, ribbons or sequins. The end product, clipped on to a note of thanks, would be such a sweet gift to receive.

Belts

Gone are the days when belts were simply made of leather. In its place, ribbons, sashes, waistbands of various materials and designs are worn to pretty effect. Here’s where you can spice things up too. Hunt for a material and finish that appeals to you and your friends. It could well be simple laces or embroidery work too. Finish the work with some clips or ringlet and viola! Your bridesmaids and girlfriends have lovely belts and waistbands to accessorise with.

The Meaning Behind The Colour

We all have something that we like best, be it a colour, dress or food. But did you know that there is a meaning behind the colour of a flower? Most of us don’t realise the hidden message behind receiving flowers, but traditionally flowers were chosen according to what their colour symbolised. For example, if a guy you fancied presented you with a bouquet of yellow roses, you would know that his feelings for you don’t extend beyond friendship and therefore you should know where you stand.

In fact, during Victorian times, flowers took on an additional importance as lovers would send each other messages using different coloured flowers. These associations were soon adopted for the bride’s bouquet and are still used today by many brides.

Today however, there are still those who are unaware of the meaning behind the colour of a flower and may be sending mixed messages as a result. So to save you the embarrassment of communicating the wrong message, we have listed the basic colour types and the meanings associated with them. Although these colours and their meanings traditionally apply to roses, you can apply them to other flowers as well.

Red

This colour symbolises romantic, passionate love. Declare your love by presenting a bunch of vermillion blooms or use it to decorate your home, your wedding or even your bridal bouquet.

 

Purple

This colour suggests that the giver of the blossom has fallen in love with the recipient at first sight. So if you want to demonstrate your infatuation with a certain someone, present them with a bunch of purple blooms together with this website address and wait.

 

Coral and Orange

This colour symbolises desire and longing.

 

Yellow

This cheerful colour symbolises friendship and joy. If you receive a bouquet of yellow blossoms, you should know where you stand.

 

Pink

This pretty feminine colour is used the express gratitude and appreciation, so why not thank your bridesmaids and wedding party with a bunch or posy of pink blossoms.

 

Light Pink

This delicate shade of pink displays feelings of admiration and sympathy.

 

Peach

This colour is a little more complex as it can mean either sympathy or gratitude.

Tea-ing Off

Serving tea as a form of respect is a traditional must at Chinese wedding ceremonies. Lawrence Tan checks out the bridal brew.

In the old days, tea was the drink of choice in China and Japan. Both cultures have developed around this humble infusion. So celebrated was its status, the British introduced it into England. Soon every genteel Englishman was sticking out his little pinkie as he sipped the hot beverage. A war was even waged in America over the sinking of an English mercantile ship carrying the sun-dried leaves. The incident came to be known as the Boston Tea Party.

In China, tea was believed to have digestive and anti-toxic qualities and litres of the drink were consumed daily. In fact, the lactose-intolerant Chinese never drank any other non-alcoholic drinks apart from tea. The fragrant drink was served to guests as a form of respect and during special festivities; tiny cups of tea were served to elders. The acceptance of the drink would symbolise forgiveness or acceptance of the individual serving the tea.

Hence even today, as part of the wedding ritual, a bride has to serve tea to her in-laws as a form of respect, a symbol of her readiness to be part of the family and a promise to obey them. Their sip of the offering is a sign of welcome, and the elders will then return the courtesy with a red packet filled with money for luck and prosperity.

According to Chinese wedding custom, the groom was not to see the bride nor have any physical contact with her. Therefore, in the past, a matchmaker or one of the groom’s aunts would be sent to pick up the bride in a sedan chair. When the bride arrived at the door, the groom would receive the bride and lead her into the main hall where the parents awaited. The couple would bow to the gods for blessings, then to the parents and finally to each other. Following that, the bride would serve tea to the groom’s parents who, on behalf of the rest of the family, would extend the welcome to the bride. Today, this tradition has evolved to create more pomp and fun to the entire affair.

Grooms, when picking up the bride, will serve tea to her parents and elders including her older brothers and sisters. When the couple arrives at the groom’s place, they will serve tea to his parents and senior family members. In the past, the groom did not serve tea on the wedding day as the bride was to have married into his family and the tea service is merely to receive her as a new family member. It was only on the third day after the wedding when the bride returned home for the customary visit when the groom would serve tea to his in-laws as a form of respect, but more importantly as thanks for bringing up his wife. Traditionally, the groom does not serve tea to anyone else in the bride’s family.

Usually a sweetened fragrant floral tea is served to bless the union with sweetness and happiness. For weddings, chrysanthemum, osmanthus or jasmine teas would be served. Latter day versions include perfumed variations such as bergamot (Earl Grey), lavender, orange blossoms and rose. The tea is sometimes sweetened with honey, an ingredient with healing properties and supposedly the ability to dispel evil.

So tightly woven is the drink into the cultural fabric of the Chinese people that an articulate tea ceremony has been designed to heighten the appreciation of the brew. Special clays such as kaolin have been used specially for the manufacturing of the dainty teapots and cups. It is believed that certain clays are able to elicit the special fragrance and flavour of the brew. The Chinese are particular about their tea and a certain teapot is used to serve only a particular type of tea so as to intensify the tea’s unique flavour and fragrance.

Due to such a practice, it is no wonder many Chinese collect teapot sets as a hobby. In fact, for weddings, new teapots and cups have to be used to signify a new beginning for the couple.

Maid of Honour Dos & Don’ts

1. Prepare the Bride

It is imperative she looks good. Touch up her makeup, adjust her veil or fix her hair whenever the need arises. Don’t forget to reassure her that all’s fine and she looks absolutely stunning – it doesn’t hurt to lie a little.

Do plan ahead. Leaving anything to the last minute means panicking on the big day over a misplaced hair accessory or some other nitty-gritty aspect.

Don’t lose your cool! You’ll be in a race against time to get her to the church or ceremony venue but more haste equals less speed. It doesn’t hurt to be fashionably late, but don’t be too late or you’ll forgo the entire wedding altogether.

2. Scheme and Plot with the “Sisters”

This is pretty self-explanatory. You’re not going to let the groom and his entourage in to see the bride that easily are you? It’s your God-given right and duty to lord it over them, at least this once!

Do make the men suffer. Don’t show mercy of any kind.

3. Lead the Bridesmaids

Being the maid of honour is a big thing and, as the name implies, a huge honour. You’re the leader of all the bridesmaids. Hence, you’re responsible for making sure they do everything required of them. Whip your troops into line. Not literally, of course.

Do follow the wedding coordinator’s instructions. And make sure every one smiles and looks their best; everyone’s looking.

Don’t be late. Punctuality is of prime importance. Ask the bride what time she’ll like you to be there and stick to the scheduled time. It’s bad to be late, especially when you’re part of the wedding party.

4. Personal Assistant

Be attentive to the bride and to her needs at all times. There are countless errands to be done, even up to hours before the wedding commences. Don’t just ask, “How can I help?” Rather, anticipate any needs the bride may have. Make sure she has something to eat and drink!

Do keep your hands free throughout the entire affair. You may be entrusted with carrying important items such as the groom’s ring and the bride’s bouquet.

Don’t keep complaining! You’re supposed to be there to help and motivate the bride, not add to her worries. She has enough problems of her own; so keep the “Do I look fat?” to yourself!

5. Shoulder To Lean On

Though this may be the happiest occasion in the bride’s life, it may also be one of the most mentally strenuous. At times she may be stressed out or overcome with emotion, so keep some tissue paper handy.

Do your best to keep her calm. Remind her of how far she’s come with a reassuring smile and gentle pat on the back.

Don’t smother her. She will need to release some of her pent up emotions. Let her cry – as long as there’s no one watching and the make-up artist is nearby.

6. Receiving the Bride

During the reception, you’ll stand in the receiving line together with the bridal party to welcome the newly married couple as they walk in.

Do remember to put on your best smile and give them a big round of applause!

Don’t steal the show; you’re not the star.

7. Dance

Come on, we know you’re dying to put on your dancing shoes! It’s common courtesy to have at least one dance, with the best man. They say one of the best places to meet your life partner is at a wedding. Who knows?

Do be friendly and outgoing. It’s a party! Eat, drink and dance to your heart’s content. Have fun!

Don’t leave the party early. It’s an important day for the bride so come on, be a good sport and be there for her right till the very end!

Final Tip: Finding a best man or maid of honour In the past, it was customary for the best man and maid of honour to be single. These days, the quality of the person in question and the closeness of the relationship between groom and best man, and bride and maid of honour are paramount. If you’re not sure what you should look out for, someone who fits the bill of being enthusiastic, willing to take charge in getting things organised, a good orator, responsible, calm and collected would be spot on. Sounds daunting? Rest assured, most brides and grooms settle for something remotely close.